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  3. Conference of “A Philosophy of Post-Fukushima”: Andrew OBERG, “Natural Disasters and Death’s Unpredictability: Is There a Good Way to Think About Our Own Deaths?”, 2nd Unit

Conference of “A Philosophy of Post-Fukushima”: Andrew OBERG, “Natural Disasters and Death’s Unpredictability: Is There a Good Way to Think About Our Own Deaths?”, 2nd Unit

Conference of “A Philosophy of Post-Fukushima”: Andrew OBERG, “Natural Disasters and Death’s Unpredictability: Is There a Good Way to Think About Our Own Deaths?”, 2nd Unit

 

The 1st conference of “A philosophy of Post-Fukushima” titled “Natural Disasters and Death’s Unpredictability: Is There a Good Way to Think about Our Own Deaths?” by Oberg, ANDREW (IRCP Researcher), was hosted by the 2nd Unit of IRCP, on July 7 at (Meeting Room 2, Building 8) Hakusan Campus, Toyo University. The contents were as follows: First, this talk began by situating us within the world of uncertainty. Some brief explanations of probability and the psychological systems involved in decision-making were then given. With this as background a question was raised: If in this unpredictable world we tend to operate as affectively and intuitively as psychology has shown us that we do, how should we think about our own inevitable future deaths? This question was approached by examining the Epicurean challenge that death is not a harm using Rosenbaum’s experienceable objection to reply to Nagel, Sorensen, Chappell, and Williams’ counterarguments that it is. It was argued that even though death itself is not a harm how we think about it can be in two ways: the process of dying and the fact of futurelessness. Finally, some ideas for how we may better think of our own upcoming deaths were given. Even though this conference was small, a lively discussion occurred during the talk, and was a fruitful one.

 OBERG