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  3. Workshop “Characteristics of Chinese Scholars’ Views of Humanity in the Edo Period—A Comparison with China”, 1st Unit

Workshop “Characteristics of Chinese Scholars’ Views of Humanity in the Edo Period—A Comparison with China”, 1st Unit

Workshop “Characteristics of Chinese Scholars’ Views of Humanity in the Edo Period—A Comparison with China”, 1st Unit

 

On August 26, 2015 at Toyo University Hakusan Campus (Building 6, Classroom 6310), a workshop entitled “Characteristics of Chinese Scholars’ Views of Humanity in the Edo Period—A Comparison with China” was held. Three Chinese scholars well-acquainted with the study of Chinese classics in Japan in the Edo Period were invited to help shed light on the views of humanity and the world held by Chinese studies scholars at that time.

A presentation by SHEN Xulu (Hangzhou Normal University) entitled “Kusumoto Sekisui’s Shuō Gappen [『朱王合編』]—Namiki Rissui and Kusumoto Sekisui” considered trends among Chinese studies scholars at the end of the Edo Period based on dialogues between the Cheng-Zhu school scholars Namiki Rissui and Kusumoto Sekisui. It is frequently said that Yōmeigaku [Yangmingism] played a major role at the end of the Edo Period. This study attempted to add to the literature on the state of ideas at the end of the Edo Period by casting light on Cheng-Zhu school scholars.

Another presentation entitled “Characteristics of How the Shingaku Movement Took to the Grass Roots in Tokugawa Japan—About Shingaku: Investigating the Mind, a Text for the People” by IRCP Visiting Researcher WU Zhen (Fudan University, School of Philosophy) showed that Chinese studies had spread to the general population in the Edo Period. Chinese studies was considered a discipline for the elite, but this presentation showed that through texts used by Shingaku adherents to proselytize, Confucian ideas had been widely received by the general population.

In his talk entitled “Mitogaku and Yōmeigaku—A Study of Confucianism-related Documents at the Tokugawa Museum,” QIAN Ming (Zhejiang Academy of Social Sciences) also presented the results of a study of documents in the Tokugawa Museum archives. These documents shed light on the characteristics of Zhu Zhiyu’s understanding of Yōmeigaku.

After these three presentations, a discussion took place based on comments by YOSHIDA Kouhei (IRCP Visiting Researcher). The major achievement of this workshop was that by showing trends among Japan’s Chinese scholars in the Edo Period, a different state of ideas in contrast to the conventional stereotype was revealed.

workshop