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3rd Unit : 3rd Study Group Session

3rd Unit : 3rd Study Group Session

The idea of kyosei (harmonious coexistence) in Sikhism - Report from Research in India

3rd Unit : Third Study Group Session

On December 20 (Tue.) 2011, Research Associate Yuji Misawa of IRCP gave a presentation titled ?The idea of kyosei (harmonious coexistence) in Sikhism ? Report from Research in India,? which was a report on his trip to accompany the field research by Researcher Taigen Hashimoto from IRCP ?Research on the kyosei (harmonious coexistence) philosophy of Guru Nanak, a medieval Hindu reformist, and field research of sacred places and data collection about Sikhism, centered around Amritsar District, Punjab, India? conducted from September16 to 26, 2011.

Sikhism was founded by Guru Nanak who indicated the third way different from both Hinduism and Islam. It grew under the protection of a powerful state called The Mughal Empire, but gradually began to suffer suppression, to which the Sikhs responded by arming themselves. These historical and philosophical developments were explained with the photos of historical sites.

3rd Unit : Third Study Group Session

Next, he introduced the Sikh temples called gurdwara they surveyed showing photos. He explained their common features and argued that they were generous enough to accept any person only if a little attention is paid. Moreover, he mentioned two incidents from the modern age and their grave significance: the massacre of unarmed Sikh residents by British Brigadier-General Reginald E.H. Dyer, and the asassination of Prime Minister Indira Priyadarshini Gandhi and the subsequent riots .

3rd Unit : Third Study Group Session

Sikhism denies ascetic practices but tells people to live a modest life in the secular world. Its generosity was well embodied by the design of their temples, but at the same time, it was a solid monotheism with a solid organization. The solidity of their organization began to cause new frictions as their influence grew larger; in view also of the existence of radical sects, their future moves require attention, concluded Mr. Misawa. In the question and answer session that followed, discussions took place on the question of the armament of the Sikh and the idea of nonkilling, the formalization in later centuries and personification of the scriptures. Finally, it was noted that despite the great theories it preaches, some elements deviated from