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2nd Unit, 2nd Conference of "A philosophy of post-Fukushima"

2nd Unit, 2nd Conference of "A philosophy of post-Fukushima"

Etienne Tassin, "Fukushima is Now: Twelve Proposals for Political Philosophy of an Ecological Crisis."

2nd Unit, 2nd Conference

On September 22, at Room 1307, Hakusan Campus, Toyo University, as part of the lecture series "A philosophy of post-Fukushima," Professor Etienne Tassin of the University Paris VII, gave a talk titled "Fukushima is Now: Twelve Proposals for Political Philosophy of an Ecological Crisis." He was also invited as a speaker for the International Symposium, "Philosophy facing the globalized world" on September 16.

2nd Unit, 2nd Conference

From the viewpoint of twentieth-century political philosophy, Prof. Tassin gave his reflections on the situation concerning "Fukushima" after the accident at Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011. His reflections were based particularly on arguments of Hannah Arendt, author of the Origins of Totalitarianism, and Gunther Anders, who developed untiring reflections on the catastrophic events in the twentieth century, such as Auschwitz, Hiroshima, and Chernobyl. According to Prof. Tassin, the event of "Fukushima" should not be conceived as a mere incidental accident but as something structurally linked to our contemporary scientific and technological civilization itself, in the same spirit as Anders, who titled one of his book Hiroshima is Everywhere. As understood by both Arendt and Anders, contemporary science and technology are no longer an instrument for human beings to control the nature but have been transformed into something "autonomous" enough to destroy the entire existence of humanity. According to Prof. Tassin, what the event of "Fukushima" indicates is the possibility of the general destruction of the world connected to the threat of nuclear power. Based on such an argument, he pointed out the necessity to question philosophically what the "world" and "politics" are like today.

The audience at the lecture included both members and non-members of the IRCP, and an extremely lively discussion was made both in Japanese and French.