1. TOYO UNIVERSITY >
  2. International Research Center for Philosophy >
  3. The Lecture Meeting of “Methodology” Study, 2nd Unit (the Joint of Hakusan Philosophy Association)

The Lecture Meeting of “Methodology” Study, 2nd Unit (the Joint of Hakusan Philosophy Association)

“Professor Murakami Katsuzo’s Final Lecture: ‘The Method of Transcendence: The Way of Descartes’”

1  

 A Study Group Session of the 2nd Unit of the IRCP was titled “Professor Murakami Katsuzo’s Final Lecture: ‘The Method of Transcendence: The Way of Descartes’,” and was held on October 25, 2014, at Toyo University Hakusan Campus (Building 6, Room 6312). The session was jointly held with the Hakusan Philosophy Association, and included individual presentations by graduate students, followed by the final lecture of Murakami, who is also the director of the IRCP.

  This lecture was preceded by a presentation from Ohno Takeshi (IRCP Researcher). Having studied under Murakami, he provided an overview of Murakami’s career and research methodology.

   In his lecture, Murakami once again raised the Descartes’ issue of transcendence, which he had previously addressed through his scholarly work. He discussed this issue comprehensively and in great detail by presenting an overview of the history of philosophy. His address assumed the perspective of Cartesian studies, while considering the issue in relation to our experiences.

   Murakami identified and intricately discussed the metaphysical issues, which are Incomprehensibility, Reality, and infinity. He sought to establish the “I” and the “you” within the same perspective of “transcendence.” Modern philosophy seems to have forgotten metaphysics. And transcendence has been driven to the fields of religion and mysticism. In contrast, Murakami argued that philosophy can develop further by returning the issue of transcendence to theoretical discourse.

   While this was his final lecture, Murakami indicated he would continue his research and establish new scholarly horizons. The lecture was followed by a question and answer session, during which Murakami developed arguments that were extremely metaphysical in nature. However, he emphasized that metaphysics is closely connected to “ethics,” which we must address via living with various problems in the contemporary world. This final lecture was a notably anomaly, as it was held by the Hakusan Philosophy Association, but it proved to be a great success and was well attended.

  A video of the lecture is available on the IRCP website, and one can find a similar discussion in Murakami’s work (chi no sonzai to sozosei [The Existence of Knowledge and Creativity], Chisen Shokan, 2014).2