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Educational Policies of the Faculty of Law

Educational Policies of the Faculty of Law

Please click on the following links for the policies of each department.

Three Policies of the Department of Law

Three Policies of the Department of Business Law

Three Policies of the Department of Law (Evening Course)

Academic Achievement Assessment Standards

Academic Achievement Assessment Standards [PDF file/103KB]

Achievements are comprehensively evaluated by means of tests, reports, etc., including attendance for registered courses only.

Report on Overall Results of Lesson Evaluation Surveys

The Faculty of Law reports the overall results of lesson evaluation surveys conducted among students every year in the spring and fall terms. On the basis of self development, faculty members work hard to improve lessons with reference to the results.

Survey Results (AY2016)

Spring term lesson evaluation survey [PDF file/213KB] 

Fall term lesson evaluation survey [PDF file/213KB]
 

Three Policies of the Department of Law

Admissions Policy

(Preferred students for admission)

The Department of Law in the Faculty of Law prefers to admit the following type of students.

Above all, students should understand the school’s founding spirit, as stated by the founder of Toyo University, Dr. Enryo Inoue : “The basis of all learning lies in philosophy.” More specifically, students should (1) study and understand diverse values and have his or her own philosophy (a view of life and the world), (2) engage in deep thinking that is both logical and systematic in a way that draws on the essence of things without being held back by preconceptions and prejudices, and (3) aim to strengthen good personal relationships by engaging autonomously and independently with society’s challenges.

Next, students should be highly motivated and proactive with regard to the Faculty of Law’s education goals, that is, having a “legal mind/legal thinking ability (an essential element of citizens and workers—a comprehensive awareness, ability for judgment, and decision-making ability that uses logical thinking methods and legal balance)” based on the school’s founding spirit and possessing a fundamental study ability suited to the “training of personnel who possess the practical linguistic knowledge to deal with a globalized world.”

More specifically, students should have the ambition to pursue a career in law in the future—for example, engaging in legal interpretations and applications as a legal specialist, considering ideals for domestic and international politics, and supporting administration in national and regional governing bodies as a civil servant in a constitutional government.

To that end, the Department of Law prefers to admit students who are highly motivated toward the study of fundamental law codes, including constitutional law, civil law, and criminal law, as well the study of foreign languages, with enthusiasm and aptitude, to accurately grasp various problems and events in society, provide solutions that are fair, just, and with a legal basis. The Department seeks students who desire to be active in a globalized world using skills in various foreign languages.

(Initiatives in the area of study etc. to be acquired prior to admission)

To acquire the “legal mind/legal thinking ability” that is the target of the Faculty of Law, a wide range of foundation subjects must be studied in high school and other educational levels prior to and after admission into the University. The general entrance examination for the Faculty of Law includes the Japanese language, foreign languages, geography, history, politics and economics, and mathematics. Further, in the National Center Test for University Admissions, diverse science and math-related courses can be selected.

First, to gain a thorough foundation in legal interpretations in the Department of Law, it is important to read and comprehend literature accurately and, above all, to think logically. For that reason, strong Japanese language skills are indispensable in this Department. An understanding of classical texts and classical language, in addition to modern language, is needed to understand legal interpretations and decisions handed down by courts.

Next, to acquire a legal foundation in a global society, we must turn our attention to other countries’ legal systems and applications. For that reason, the study of foreign languages is essential.

Furthermore, in the study of today’s legal systems, understanding historical details is important, and knowledge of world and Japanese histories is therefore incredibly useful. Law is obviously inseparable from society; hence, a basic understanding of politics, economics, and geography is also essential.

Finally, as logical thinking is required in the study of law, knowledge regarding science and math-related courses, such as mathematics, physics, and chemistry, is also useful. Knowledge of science-related courses is also required because the regulation of law extends to the natural environment and reproductive technology.

As is evident from the aforementioned details, the Department of Law requires extensive study in high school and other educational levels prior to admission and has given overall comprehensive consideration to its examination methods in order to set examination subjects suited to each method.

Curriculum Policy

The Faculty of Law is looking to develop personnel who have studied law, acquired a legal mind, and possess abilities to provide solutions to social problems while also being capable of dealing with a globalized society.

To study law and acquire legal knowledge, courses have been formulated in a manner such that the basic six law codes and many other laws are understood from different perspectives. Therefore, emphasis is placed on thoroughly understanding basic theories and principles and on understanding legal interconnections.

For acquiring a legal mind, many practical and lecture courses provide training so that thinking ability is acquired whereby one can modestly listen to contrasting advantages and values and can take decisions with an unbiased and balanced sensitivity on the basis of just and objective standards. Therefore, emphasis is placed on legal interpretations and applications useful to society and practice rather than on redundant theory.

Furthermore, to deal with a globalized society, certain courses aim to cultivate not only fundamental abilities for communication but also practical foreign language abilities adequate for the business world. In addition, in certain courses, this language ability is used in the study of legal systems and political situations in a target country.

Therefore, these ideals are embodied by the curriculum and model courses so that students can freely and efficiently construct a four-year curriculum according their individual aims.

Diploma Policy

In terms of acquisition of legal knowledge, the entire scope is covered without leaning toward either public law or private law in order to produce students who have taken individual paths to acquiring expertise in the basic six law codes and other essential legal courses.

We are producing personnel who have acquired the ability to present solutions to diverse legal conflicts in society with a fair and just legal basis and an accurate grasp of problems.

In terms of dealing with a globalized society, we are producing students who have acquired the ability to cope with legal issues by personally communicating in international society. They are knowledgeable on concepts that form the basis of all legal rules, regardless of different legal systems in other countries.

We are also producing personnel who can contribute to the world by using a rich legal foundation while prioritizing autonomy and cooperation as a member of society.

 

 

Three Policies of the Department of Business Law

Admissions Policy

(Preferred students for admission)

The Department of Business Law in the Faculty of Law prefers to admit the following type of students.

Above all, students should understand the school’s founding spirit, as stated by the founder of Toyo University, Dr. Enryo Inoue : “The basis of all learning lies in philosophy.” More specifically, the student should (1) study and understand diverse values and have his or her own philosophy (a view of life and the world), (2) engage in deep thinking that is both logical and systematic in a way that draws on the essence of things without being held back by preconceptions and prejudices, and (3) aim to strengthen good personal relationships by engaging autonomously and independently with society’s challenges.

Next, students should be highly motivated and proactive with regard to the Faculty of Law education goals, that is, having a “legal mind/legal thinking ability (an essential element of citizens and workers—a comprehensive awareness, ability for judgment, and decision-making ability with a logical thinking method and legal balance)” based on the school’s founding spirit, and possessing fundamental study ability suited to the “training of personnel who possess the practical linguistic ability to deal with a globalized world.”

More specifically, students should have the ambition to pursue a career that combines law and business—for example, applying legal knowledge to business in Japan, dealing with legal problems in a global society using various languages, and promoting legalization in sports and business. To that end, the Department of Business Law prefers to admit students who have excellent motivation toward the study of fundamental law codes centering on private law, including civil law and commercial law, and the study of foreign languages. The students should be able to combine enthusiasm and aptitude to provide solutions for various business-focused social problems and events, together with the desire to be active in a globalized world on the basis of diverse foreign language skills.

(Initiatives toward study etc. to be acquired prior to admission)

To acquire the “legal mind/legal thinking ability” that is the target of the Faculty of Law, a wide range of foundation subjects must be studied in high school and other educational levels prior to admission, and be studied after admission. The general entrance examination for the Faculty of Law includes the Japanese language, foreign languages, geography, history, politics and economics, and mathematics, and, in the National Center Test for University Admissions, diverse science and math-related courses can be selected.

To be a businessperson who has acquired legal grounding in global society, other countries’ legal systems and legal applications must be understood. Understanding of other countries’ legal systems is connected to deeper understanding of Japanese law. For that reason, in the Department of Business Law, foreign language study is essential. Law can also be applied to the environment surrounding sports. The sports stage is not limited to Japan but, in fact, is spread across the world, so to study sports business, an understanding of other countries’ legal systems and applications is essential, along with foreign language study.

Next, to study law, it is important above all to consider things logically, so strong Japanese language ability is essential. In terms of legal interpretations, knowledge of modern and classical literature is required.

Furthermore, in the study of today’s legal systems, understanding historical details is important; therefore, knowledge of world history and Japanese history is incredibly useful. Law is obviously inseparable from society, which is why a basic understanding of politics, economics, and geography is also essential.

Finally, as logical thinking is required in the study of law, knowledge regarding science and math-related courses, such as mathematics, physics, and chemistry, is also useful. Knowledge of science-related courses is also required because the regulation of law extends to the natural environment and reproductive technology.

As is evident from the aforementioned details, the Department of Law requires extensive study in high school and other educational levels prior to admission and has given overall comprehensive consideration to its examination methods to set examination subjects suited to each method.

Curriculum Policy

To fulfill a role in an international society, students attempt to acquire a legal mind through the study of law; accordingly, they acquire communication abilities, the ability to listen modestly to advantages and values that contrast with one’s own, and the ability to take decisions with an unbiased and balanced sensitivity on the basis of just and objective standards.

To develop and cultivate such abilities, the curriculum policy (1) emphasizes communication ability, (2) thoroughly provides basic theory and principles, (3) provides an understanding of legal interconnection, and (4) provides legal applications useful in reality and practice. While incorporating related laws, such as corporate and economic law, the curriculum develops a thorough basis in the following: (1) legal study in first-year education, (2) combined understanding of substantive law and legal procedures, and (3) application of law in society.

Diploma Policy 

(A) While emphasizing the study of law in areas of private law, including civil and commercial law, legal expertise is acquired through the study of law-related courses. In this way, legal grounding, that is, a legal mind, can be acquired, through which solutions with a fair and just legal basis can be presented with an accurate grasp of problems in diverse legal conflicts of society.

(B) Through course study that contributes to (1) basic understanding of management, (2) understanding of globalized, international society, and (3) legal understanding of sports business, the ability to analyze and respond to applied examples is acquired, thereby contributing to career development as a businessperson. 

 

Three Policies of the Department of Law (Evening Course)

Admissions Policy

(Preferred students for admission)

The Department of Law in the Faculty of Law prefers to admit the following type of student.

Above all, students should understand the school founding spirit, as stated by the founder of Toyo University, Dr. Enryo Inoue, Ph.D : “The basis of all learning lies in philosophy.” More specifically, the student should (1) study and understand diverse values and have his or her own philosophy (a view of life and the world), (2) engage in deep thinking that is both logical and systematic in a way that draws on the essence of things without being held back by preconceptions and prejudices, and (3) aim to strengthen good personal relationships by engaging autonomously and independently in society’s challenges.

Next, students should be highly motivated and proactive with regard to Faculty of Law education goals, that is, have a “legal mind/legal thinking ability (an essential element of citizens and workers—a comprehensive awareness, ability for judgment, and decision-making ability that possesses logical thinking methods and legal balance)” based on the school’s founding spirit and possess the fundamental study ability suited to the “training of personnel who possess the practical linguistic knowledge to deal with a globalized world.”

Because lectures are held in the evening time slot and students admitted are working adults, they must be highly motivated to study law and foreign languages within time restrictions.

(Initiatives in the area of study etc. to be acquired prior to admission)

To acquire the “legal mind/legal thinking ability” that is the target of the Faculty of Law, a wide range of foundation subjects must be studied in high school and other educational levels prior to and after admission. The general entrance examination for the Faculty of Law includes the Japanese language, foreign languages, geography, history, politics and economics, and mathematics. Further, in the National Center Test for University Admissions, diverse science and math-related courses can be selected.

First, to gain a thorough foundation in legal interpretations in the Department of Law (Evening Course), it is important to read and comprehend literature accurately and, above all, to think logically. For that reason, strong Japanese language skills are indispensable in the Department of Law (Evening Course). Understanding of classical texts and classical language, in addition to modern language, is needed to understand legal interpretations and decisions handed down by courts.

Next, to acquire a legal foundation in a global society, it is necessary to also pay attention to other countries’ legal systems/legal applications. For that reason, the study of foreign languages is essential.

Furthermore, in the study of today’s legal systems, understanding historical details is important; therefore, knowledge of world and Japanese histories is incredibly useful. Law is obviously inseparable from society, which means that a basic understanding of politics, economics, and geography is also essential.

Finally, as logical thinking is required in the study of law, knowledge regarding science and math-related courses, such as mathematics, physics, and chemistry, is also useful. Knowledge of science-related courses is also required because the regulation of law extends to the natural environment and reproductive technology.

As is evident from the aforementioned details, the Department of Law (Evening Course) requires extensive study in high school, etc. prior to admission, and has given overall comprehensive consideration to its examination methods to set examinations subjects suited to each method.

Curriculum Policy

The Faculty of Law is looking to develop personnel who have studied law, acquired a legal mind, and possess abilities to provide solutions to problems that occur in society, while also being capable of dealing with a globalized society.

To study law and to acquire legal knowledge, courses have been established so that the basic six law codes and many other laws are understood from different perspectives. Therefore, emphasis is placed on thoroughly understanding basic theories and principles and on understanding legal interconnections.

To acquire a legal mind, many practical and lecture courses provide training so that thinking ability is acquired whereby one can modestly listen to contrasting advantages and values and can take decisions with an unbiased and balanced sensitivity on the basis of just and objective standards. Therefore, emphasis is placed on legal interpretations and applications useful to actual society and practice rather than on redundant theory.

Furthermore, to deal with a globalized society, certain courses aim to cultivate not only fundamental abilities for communication but also practical foreign language abilities adequate for the business world. In addition, in certain courses, this language ability is used in the study of legal systems and political situations in a target country.

Such a curriculum opens many doors for working adults aiming to be legal practitioners. Further, students can freely construct a curriculum that extensively covers public and private law according to their individual aims.

Diploma Policy

In terms of acquisition of legal knowledge, the entire scope is covered without leaning toward either public law or private law in order to produce students who have taken their own path to acquiring expertise in the basic six law codes and other essential legal courses.

We are producing personnel who have acquired the ability to present solutions to diverse legal conflicts in society with a fair and just legal basis and with an accurate grasp of problems.

In terms of dealing with a globalized society, we are producing students who have acquired the ability to cope with legal issues by personally communicating in international society according to concepts that form the basis of all legal rules, regardless of different legal systems in other countries.

We are also producing personnel who can contribute to the world by using their rich legal foundations while prioritizing autonomy and cooperation as a member of society.