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Educational Policies

Diploma Policy

The Faculty of Economics strives to foster human resources who possess independence, broad-based knowledge, the capacity for sound judgment, and the ability to think about Japan’s economic society in an interdisciplinary fashion based upon rich humanism, economic theories, and a global perspective.

An undergraduate degree will be awarded to students who attain an understanding of the fundamental theories of economics, broad-based knowledge of economic societies inside and outside Japan, linguistic proficiency (in English), and the capacity to use these abilities to analyze real issues and seek out methods for solving them.

Completion of the designated course credits is required for earning a degree. Students are also encouraged to enroll in seminar classes and in the graduation research class.

Toyo University Faculty of Economics Grading & Evaluation Criteria

Comprehensive evaluation of students’ performance will be performed through scheduled exams (midterm and final exams), short tests, in-class reports, class attendance, homework, and out-of-class reports; it will be based on attitude and participation in class.

Three Policies of the Department of Economics

 

Admissions Policy

Applicants who possess the following capabilities are sought.

1.  Students with excellent knowledge and practical ability that will give them the foundational skills necessary for pursuing study after they are admitted to the department. (knowledge, comprehension, and practical ability)

- With regard to Japanese language arts, geography/history, civics, mathematics, and English, students need to have the standard level of knowledge offered in secondary education, in addition to the ability to communicate and deliberate at a standard level in the Japanese language.

- Students with excellent ability in sports

2.  Students with fundamental skills that enable them to analyze problems and issues from multiple perspectives and based on sound reasoning. (cognitive and judgment abilities)

3.  Students capable of accurately expressing their thoughts and communicating them to others.

(technical ability and expressivity)

4.  Students with a desire to gain a standard level of knowledge of economics and analytical methods and to acquire cognitive ability and judgment capacity rooted in the study of economics.

(interest and ambition)

5.  Students with a desire to actively engage in and take a deep interest in the state of society. (attitude)

Curriculum Policy

To improve students’ communication abilities, logical thinking, and comprehensive judgment, the curriculum includes language classes, required classes; specialized elective subjects A & B, and general education classes. After students master the basics and gradually develop a standard level of foundational knowledge in economics, they may choose a thematic focus that relates to their personal interests.

1. Foster communication skills through the study of languages.

2. Build communication skills, theory-based cognitive skills, and comprehensive judgment capabilities through seminar classes that include individual reports and a graduation thesis.

3. Ensure that students acquire foundational knowledge and foster mathematical cognitive ability and theory-based cognitive skills through required classes and first-year/second-year specialized elective subject A.

4. Ensure that students acquire practical and developmental knowledge of economics through third-year/fourth-year specialized elective subject A. Foster practical skills and a broad perspective by including fields peripheral to economics in specialized elective subject B.

5. Ensure through general education classes that students gain a broad outlook that enables them to explore issues that transcend their specialized field.

Diploma Policy

Degrees will be awarded to students who are judged to have developed the following capabilities.

(knowledge and comprehension)

1. Students with an understanding of the fundamental content and analytical methods of orthodox economics.

2. Students who have acquired the general level of education that is expected of a competent citizen in society.

(cognitive and judgment abilities)

3. Students who have the ability to exercise judgment, in addition to engaging in comprehensive and fundamental deliberation on social issues by employing economic thought approaches and based on objective information.

(interest and ambition)

4. Students who are able to utilize, in a practical manner, the cognitive methods of economics, in addition to a knowledge of economics, to proactively and independently address essential issues in society.

5. Students who have the capacity to pursue their own view of social life by applying academic learning that is based on diverse value perspectives.

(attitude)

6. Students with the capacity to engage in society as a central actor based on the cognitive methods of economics.

7. Students who have developed a broad perspective that enables them to continuously explore issues that transcend their specialized field.

(technical ability and expressivity)

8. Students who demonstrate facility in the oral and written expression of their own ideas based upon objective information and processed information backed by economics and statistics.

Three Policies of the Department of International Economics

Admissions Policy

Amid the rapid expansion and advancement of globalization, the Department of International Economics strives to provide education that nurtures students who are proficient in liberal arts, confident in employing the foundational theories of economics and international economics, possess broad insights into global economics and society, and have the ability to demonstrate specialized knowledge while being actively engaged in societies inside and outside of Japan. To that end, the department seeks students with basic capabilities in these areas, in addition to a desire to nurture and develop those capabilities.

In other words, we seek to enroll

1.  Students with a strong awareness of issues in global economics and society, in addition to communication skills in foreign language(s) such as English;

2.  Students with intense curiosity about real-world economic and social occurrences and who satisfy the requirements of minimum level of mathematical thinking skills;

3.  Students with broad intellectual interest in society, history, culture, and the like inside Japan and around the world.

Based on this perspective, the department’s general entrance exam consists of questions focusing on fundamental skills in Japanese language arts, English, social studies, and mathematics. In particular, the exam emphasizes English ability, which is a central pillar for global communication, and heavily weights English questions in several of its sections.

Furthermore, the examination for candidates who are recommended by their senior high school principals contains short essays and an interview, which assess applicants’ command of the Japanese language, their reasoning abilities, and their awareness of social issues. International students are also welcomed into the department, and a predetermined number of places are specifically allotted for students in this category.

Curriculum Policy

The curriculum aims at fostering human resources who have the capacity to be active on the stage of international economics and society. The curriculum is structured on the basis of the following four foundations.

1.  Specialized subjects are emphasized from a practical, hands-on perspective, and focus is placed on fostering the ability to identify and solve problems. To that end, this approach starts with imparting an understanding of real-world economic issues and various case studies, followed by theory-based learning.

2.  Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of global communication skills. To acquire these skills, English classes are required from the first to the third year, while German, French, and Chinese are offered as electives through the second year. Classes are organized so that students can develop practical language ability throughout their four-year period of study.

3.  In the first year, classes aimed at boosting students’ skills related to economic data and information analysis are offered to help them gain the ability to respond to an environment in which information freely flows across national borders via IT networks.

4.  As a way of facilitating students’ smooth transition from high school to the university, ongoing guidance and specialized instruction are offered in small groups until students graduate. Specifically, this instruction takes the form of a foundational seminar class in the first year, which helps students acquire the requisite academic skills for university study, followed by further seminar classes from the second year, which hone those initial skills.

Diploma Policy

The Department of International Economics awards undergraduate degrees to students who meet the following requirements.

1.  Students who understand the fundamental theories of economics and international economics, who have acquired broad-based knowledge regarding international economics and society, and who are able to exercise judgment and take action from an international perspective. 

2.  Students who have developed and improved their ability to access information, including multilingual and IT skills, who have acquired the communication skills necessary to interact in global society, and who have acquired the information-gathering and analytical skills necessary in our IT society.

3.  Students who have attained the capacities for expression and reasoning expected of a highly educated citizen in society and who have developed abilities for analysis.

Three Policies of the Department of Policy Studies

Admissions Policy

The Department of Policy Studies seeks to admit the following types of students.

1.  Students with a broad interest in real-world society and who are eager to improve society through their active contribution.

2.  Students with an understanding of people who are different from themselves and who possess a sufficient degree of openness toward and willingness to cooperate with others.

3.  Students who demonstrate persistence and daily, consistent effort that will enable them to steadily mature with an eye toward the future.

4.  Students who share the department’s educational philosophy and have a desire to develop into the kind of individuals the department seeks to foster.

Curriculum Policy

In the Department of Policy Studies, students will acquire, in a relatively short period of time, the ability to propose policy measures useful in real-world applications that target our complex society. The curriculum is systematically arranged to enable efficient learning in this regard.

1.  Students will develop balanced competence in discovery, observation, information and knowledge, analysis and deliberation, and expression and application, which are included in the curriculum to instill the desired capacities.

2.  Students will develop competence in fundamental skills, the real-world application of skills, and developmental skills, which take the form of gradual steps in the curriculum to raise students’ capabilities at each stage.

3.  Students will acquire policy-based competence in knowledge areas that include geographic regions/public entities, lifestyle/labor, and the environment/information, which are included in the curriculum according to policy area to deepen students’ insights into policy.

Diploma Policy

The Department of Policy Studies ultimately strives to produce graduates who are “human beings capable of acting and thinking independently and equipped with the ability to propose policy measures that contribute to real-world society.” Specifically, we seek to send out into society graduates with the following four competencies.

1.  The capacity for discovery and observation

This includes the ability to identify essential problems in real-world society and zero in on the challenges associated with those problems.

2.  The capacity for gathering information and knowledge

This includes the ability to gather and assimilate information and to utilize it as knowledge.

3.  The capacity for analysis and deliberation

This includes the ability to deliberate on and consider matters using a theory-based approach based on source materials and to form an accurate grasp of issues.

4.  The capacity for making and implementing proposals

This includes the ability to exchange opinions with people of diverse backgrounds and philosophies while cooperating with others and taking action in the real world.

Three Policies of the Department of Economics (Evening Course)

Admissions Policy

Applicants who have the following capabilities are sought.

1.  Students with knowledge that will serve them as foundation skills necessary for pursuing study after they enroll in the department. (knowledge, comprehension, and practical ability)

With regard to Japanese language arts, geography/history, civics, mathematics, and English, students with the standard level of knowledge gained during secondary education, in addition to the ability to communicate and deliberate at a standard level in the Japanese language.

2.  Students with fundamental skills that enable them to discuss matters based on sound reasoning. (cognitive and judgment abilities)

3.  Students who are able to accurately express their thoughts and communicate them to others. (technical ability and expressivity)

4.  Students with the desire to gain a fundamental knowledge of economics, who have a broad-based interest in sociology, and who seek to acquire the capacity for reasoned judgment. (interest and ambition)

5.  Students with the desire to actively engage in society and take a deep interest in the state of society. (attitude)

Curriculum Policy

The curriculum includes required classes; specialized elective subjects A & B, and general education classes that foster communication skills, cognitive ability, and the capacity for sound judgment. In the first year, students master the basics and develop a standard level of foundational knowledge in economics, after which they are allowed to choose a thematic focus that relates to their personal interests.

1. Through seminar classes that include individual reports and a graduation thesis, the curriculum fosters communication skills, cognitive abilities, and the capacity for sound judgment.

2. Required subjects and specialized electives ensure that students acquire foundational knowledge while also fostering cognitive ability.

3. Specialized elective subject A (which is offered from the second year and does not include elective/required subjects) ensures that students acquire a practical and developmental knowledge of economics while also fostering skills for applying that knowledge from a broad-based sociological perspective that transcends economics and aligns with students’ interests.

4. General education classes ensure that students gain a broad perspective that enables them to explore issues that transcend their specialized field.

Diploma Policy

Degrees will be awarded to students who are judged to have developed the following capabilities.

(knowledge and comprehension)

1. Students with an understanding of fundamental economics and who, following their personal interests, have acquired the level of sociological knowledge required to be an active citizen in society.

2. Students who have acquired the general level of education expected of a competent citizen in society.

(cognitive and judgment abilities)

3. Students who are able to comprehensively discuss social issues.

(interest and ambition)

4. Students who are able to utilize, in a practical manner, the cognitive methods of sociology, in addition to a knowledge of economics, to independently tackle issues in society.

(attitude)

5. Students with the capacity to engage as a member of society utilizing the cognitive methods of economics.

6. Students who have gained a broad outlook and knowledge that enable them to hold diverse value perspectives.

(technical ability and expressivity)

7. Students who are able to express their own ideas orally and in writing using a theory-based approach.